Real Estate and Planned Giving

Recently, a client of mine set up some sort of widget on their website to encourage gifts of real estate – and guess what – we have too many leads, most of whom are not connected to the charity and were just looking online for ways to gift their unwanted real estate.

Apparently, a lot of people have property that they would like to give away (most of which sane charities may reject for various reasons).  But, this phenomenon may be hint to big opportunities being overlooked by most in the fundraising world.

Our latest new webinar – Real Estate and Planned Giving – is scheduled for tomorrow (Wednesday 9/25 at 12 NOON EASTERN).

In this session, we will cover the basics of real estate gifts, and then go through Bargain SalesLife EstatesCRTsCGAs and Lead Trusts as vehicles for creative planned gifts funded with real estate.

Our goal for this session is to expose you the breadth of creative ideas for real estate while showing you how to present these ideas to your donors.

CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO OR TO REGISTER

Also, our next Planned Giving Boot Camp dates are set:

And, finally, check out the recordings for our recent sessions for September 2019:

  • Interested in our prior webinar: Is the Great Wealth Transfer Finally Here? (my annual search for the $41 trillion dollar wealth transfer as predicted in the mid-1990’s).  In over 50 data slides, I reviewed all of the latest fundraising and planned giving numbers from Giving USA, the VSE, the IRS (focusing on the itemizer question), and updated demographic projections. Just $35 for the recording and PowerPoint (so you can create your own presentations with the data).  CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE THE RECORDING
  • Interested in our prior webinar: Planned Giving for High Net Wealth Prospects?  This is a new session devoted entirely to planned giving vehicle discussions with High Net Wealth individuals (assets of $5 million+). We will go through tax and planning issues facing this level of prospects and offer a handful of new approaches to Planned Giving that should spark their interest in a structured gift.  CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE THE RECORDING
As always, thank you for considering our programs and services!  Please feel free to email me if you have any questions.
Best regards,
Jonathan Gudema, Esq.
Principal, Planned Giving Advisors, LLC
jonathan@plannedgivingadvisors.com
www.plannedgivingadvisors.com

Planned Giving for High Net Wealth Prospects

If you have ever worked with (as an adviser, fundraiser, or whatever) a high net wealth family (tens of millions and up), you’ll know this is different territory than even your regular major gift donor.

For the past 13 years, in addition to being a Planned Giving consultant, I’ve moonlighted as a Trusts & Estates attorney/go-fer for a high net wealth family.  This work initially was sporadic but as the windfalls started exceeding the billion dollar mark (and the wealth transfers in the hundreds of millions), this client has essentially become a job.
With all of my exposure to the highest net wealth family planning issues, the schemes from planners/promoters being pitched, and witnessing first hand what works and what doesn’t, I have decided to share this insider view in my newest webinar: Planned Giving for High Net Wealth Prospects (this Wednesday at 12 NOON EASTERN).
Our goal for this session is to help you start developing a successful approach to presenting Planned Giving ideas to your wealthiest supporters.  But, don’t expect the same old planned giving.

The Super-Aging of America!

Picture1Maine is officially the oldest state!  (According to the Weldon Cooper Center for Public Service at the University of Virginia). And, Maine – with over 20% of its population over age 65 – is perhaps the first “Super-Aged” state in the U.S.  (Florida, West Virginia, and Vermont are not far behind). CLICK HERE FOR AN ARTICLE ABOUT MAINE’S PROBLEMS

And, from an economic and social perspective, this is disastrous.  Let alone that fact that the entire country may reach “Super-Aged” by 2030 (according to the latest from the U.S. Census bureau).

What does this have to do with Planned Giving?  How about Super-Aged databases of donors?  How about the Great Wealth Transfer finally starting to happen?

Anyway, I just finished collecting data for my upcoming webinar: Is the Great Wealth Transfer Finally Here? (which will include updated 2018 fundraising #’s from Giving USA, the VSE and itemizer data to see how the 2018 Tax Law really impacted nonprofit fundraising, as well as the most recent population estimates).

CLICK HERE IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN WATCHING THE LIVE WEBINAR (OR RECEIVING THE RECORDING LINK) ON THIS YEAR’S UPDATES AND PROGNOSTICATIONS BASED ON THE RAW DATA!

All registrants will receive the actual PowerPoint (with access to the data behind the graphs) and the recording link!

Truth discovered – Where the $54 billion drop in “itemized charitable deductions” came from

Ok, not quite the big lie I had claimed – but definitely not a drop in charitable giving of $54 billion!!  And, definitely misleading and not an accurate picture of the impact of the 2018 Tax Plan on charitable giving.

I will give the author of the initial MarketWatch article, Leslie Albrecht, credit that everything she wrote was technically true (not the case with Newsweek and others who picked up the story).

Read the headline carefully – Americans slashed their “charitable deductions” by $54 billion after Republican tax-code overhaul.  Click the picture if you want to see the story.

Yes, if you look at the IRS website’s data on 2017 and 2018, you will find $54 billion less in itemized charitable contributions listed between the two years. BUT – those numbers are incomplete – as the IRS tells you!!!  The highest net wealth tax payers typically file after their extension by October 15th!!!  In other words, the biggest donors haven’t filed their tax returns yet for 2018 (and the IRS 2017 numbers are not even close to being final, too)!! So, the biggest donors’ itemized deductions are not on the charts yet.

In other words, the numbers she pulled from 2017 and 2018 are completely useless, and very deceptive.  As I mentioned in my last post, overall charitable giving actually went up between 2017 and 2018.  Yes, individual giving was slightly down but not enough to make any dramatic assumptions or conclusions.

If this stuff interests you, check out a presentation I am giving in September that includes this topic and more about the Great Wealth Transfer:

Is the Great Wealth Transfer Finally Here?

Here is one more headline to laugh at: