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Q & A in Planned Giving Tomorrow – IRAs, RMDs, and QCDs – Familiar with these?

Image result for q & aRecently, I’ve starting submitting for the Q & A section in Planned Giving Tomorrow – Here’s my first submission….

QUESTION

We are looking at some RMD info related to Jane’s IRA account, and we are assuming that the school satisfies the QCD requirement, but just want to check.

ANSWER

Highly focused people (usually the successful ones) often miss the easy stuff in their focus on the bottom line: raising money now. The question above came to me via email from a top capital campaign consultant. He really knows his stuff. And yet, he had to ask me what RMD and QCD meant!

Do you know?

RMD is Required Minimum Distribution. That is an amount you are required (as an individual over age 70.5) to withdraw from your IRA and other qualified retirement accounts annually.

Why is this so important?

The IRA charitable rollover provision (which is, by the way, PERMANENT now if you hadn’t heard!) allows donors age 70.5 and older to give up to $100,000 to your charity directly from their IRAs. It doesn’t work for other retirement accounts—yet. It just so happens that the law allows donors to direct their RMDs (which would be fully taxable to them) to your charity without any taxes.  This assumes your charity is QCD eligible.

You know that one, right? QCD means Qualified Charitable Distributions. If you are a regular charity – not a Donor Advised Fund or a Supporting Organization—you are more than likely QDC eligible. In a nutshell, using the charitable rollover provision gives donors an opportunity to support a cause they care about and avoid taxes on their RMD! Donors in this age range get this. You should, too, as these can be easy $100,000 gifts. Even if your donor has already taken their RMDs (which you can’t un-take), using an IRA to make a gift to charity is still a great idea. Talk it up with your donors!

If you have interesting questions that you wouldn’t mind being published in this blog and/or in Planned Giving Tomorrow, email your Q’s to me at jonathan@plannedgivingadvisors.com.  And, check out Planned Giving Tomorrow by clicking here!

DON’T FORGET TO CHECK OUT OUR SUMMER LINE-UP OF WEBINAR PROGRAMS!

Largest Single Gift – $6.24 Million – to Henry Street Settlement

This very nice woman was a legal secretary until age 96 – probably never someone who stood out for fundraisers to fawn over.  (CLICK HERE OR THE PICTURE TO SEE THE STORY IN THE NEW YORK TIMES)

Yet, she just left close to $9 million to fund scholarships, with the Henry Street Settlement receiving $6.24 million, their largest single gift (probably by far) via a charitable bequest (i.e. one of the many unknown planned giving donors who quietly make a huge impact after their lives).

Check your nonprofit org’s records.  Who’s made the 5 largest gifts to the institution?

I would be surprised if bequests or other planned giving options don’t comprise at least 4 out of your top 5.

Fundraisers and heads of nonprofits – take note! Sylvia Bloom – the woman in the picture – actually left most of her estate to be used for scholarships at the discretion of her niece (who happens to be on the board of the Henry Street Settlement)!

Sylvia and her niece are both incredible people.  But, just think about this. What if Sylvia had been one of your long term direct mail donors – I am guessing that she supported plenty of charities during her life.

Imagine if your org had any planned giving efforts – maybe planned giving newsletters or other marketing that encouraged Sylvia to consider your organization as a recipient of her legacy giving.  Then image if your organization didn’t do anything in planned giving.

Think about the missed opportunity.  Sylvia probably didn’t receive much direct planned giving content and opted to allow her niece full discretion over her legacy.

For nonprofits in America who been around awhile (15 or more years) to not engage in any meaningful planned giving efforts is just irresponsible.

The country is aging fast. Your data base is probably aging faster.  Planned giving is really the only sensible way to make sure your institution has a decent chance to share in estates like Sylvia’s.

So where do you start?  Check out our Planned Giving Boot Camp 6-part webinar crash course by CLICKING HERE.

Or, our Summer 2018 line up of training programs! CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE

Ok, so I have to plug more courses at any chance I have.  Seriously, these courses are all designed to put immediately useful tools and ideas into your hands. You’ll learn about creating your own Legacy Opener (patent pending;). I’ll tell you which planned giving marketing options work and which don’t!  Which vehicles are appropriate and which are not!  And, not too much on the technical end!

Thank you for making it to the end of this post!  I wonder how many readers actually get this far!

 

 

Time to get your planned giving act together!

Related imageBaby boomers getting older….

The wealth transfer is coming….

Blah, blah, blah.  The same old, same old and no real difference in the numbers for planned giving.  Right?

I know what I am about to say is self-serving (this is a blog and I’m constantly promoting myself and my services) but if you have a minute, read what I am about to write carefully.

The estate tax exemption just doubled (i.e. people can leave more to family estate tax free).  Bad for planned giving?

Wrong. Amazing for planned giving!!!

Why?

People with means are going to their estate planning attorneys.  Considering options. Redoing their estate plans.

How often does this happen with your typical planned giving prospect?  You usually have no idea unless someone tells you.

So, I am telling you this (from my estate planning practice – more than half of my business):  your wealthier donors are meeting with their estate planning attorneys NOW.

That means NOW is the time to make sure they are considering YOUR institution for some sort of planned gift!

In other words, you need to wake up your sleeping planning giving program. You need to train your staff (click here to see more on my upcoming training!). You need to put some budget towards planned giving.

Meaning: it’s time to get your planned giving act in order! The boomers will start moving on. There are a lot more of them than their predecessors and they actually have a lot of money.  Planned Giving will grow dramatically in the next few years.  You and your organization need to get ready!

Sorry – You may have missed our Donor-Friendly Webinar on the New Tax Law BUT you can register to receive the recording

On Jan. 22, we gave a Donor-Friendly Webinar Briefing on the New Tax Law (goal being that you can use the content for your own donor-friendly briefings and/or invite leadership to join the webinar).  This was the predominant request from among our 250 attendees to our initial briefing on the new tax law from last week (see below for comments on that session). 

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE THE RECORDING OF OUR DONOR-FRIENDLY BRIEFING ON THE NEW TAX LAW

In addition to receiving the actual PowerPoint and the recording link, you will also receive draft donor-friendly pamphlet language – included with your registration. 

Here is our first comment:

After sitting in your Tax Bill Seminar, I knew today’s seminar was something I needed.  Unfortunately, I joined in late and didn’t download the presentation.  Can the presentation be emailed to me?  And, I’m definitely looking forward to the information coming out in “donor” language in the next couple of weeks.  Really appreciate your explanations and not the typical “sky is falling” hype we’ve been getting.

Thank you as always for considering our programs.

Our Tax Briefing on Monday (1/8/18) was also a huge success – over 250 attendees logged-in to hear key points for nonprofit fundraisers on the new tax law!  CLICK HERE IF YOU WANT TO PURCHASE THE RECORDING

Sampling of comments we received after Jan. 8 Tax Law Briefing for Nonprofit Fundraisers:

“Thanks for the webinar today. Any chance you’d be interested in holding a seminar for donors about how the new tax bill might affect their charitable giving.”

“Thanks for your excellent presentation!”

“Thank you for the presentation last week.”

“Nice job on the presentation today.”

“Thoroughly enjoyed and was educated by your webinar today.”

“Thank you so much for an informative session this morning!”

“Thanks so much for the webinar presentation today regarding the 2018 Tax Law changes — I found it to be very helpful.”

“Thoroughly enjoyed the presentation this morning and got a number of questions answered, plus good direction for the future with the 70 1/2s and their IRAs. Thanks!”